Category Archives: learning

Special Event: “The Photographer’s Copyright”

Event Details

  • Date: Friday, February 13, 2015
  • Time: 12:40 pm – 1:40 pm
  • Location: University of Iowa College of Law Boyd Law Building, Room 235 [Map]

About the Event

The Iowa Intellectual Property Law Society and the Iowa Innovation, Business & Law Center welcome Professor Justin Hughes to campus to discuss copyright law and photography. Professor Hughes teaches intellectual property and international trade courses at Layola Law school. He remains a Senior Lecturer and Co-Director of the SIPO-Cardoza Program at at Cardozo Law School in New York. Professor Hughes is a former Senior Advisor to the Undersecretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property, and in that capacity, served as chief negotiator for the US at the Diplomatic Conferences that completed the Beijing Treaty on Audiovisual Performances (2012) and the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Printed Works for the Blind (2013).

Event Poster

Click on the poster below for a larger view, or click here to download the PDF.

Hughes poster - FINAL

Digital Sign Visual

Below is the digital signage visual (in JPG format). Click the image for a larger view (in PNG format).

Hughes digital sign - FINAL

Event Location Map

Photography Workshop: Beyond a Snapshot: the Art of Building and Creating Fine Photographs

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River Action and the Figge Art Museum are co-sponsoring a workshop for photographers of all skill levels who are interested in exploring ways to improve the quality of their photos. The workshop, Beyond a Snapshot: the Art of Building and Creating Fine Photographs, will be held on Saturday, March 8th at the Figge Art Museum, 225 W 2nd St, Davenport, IA 52801. The workshop will begin at 12:45p and conclude at 4:30p. [REGISTER | Download PDF Flyer]

Internationally acclaimed photographer, Joel Sartore, has stated that there are three essential ingredients needed to make a quality photograph–light, composition, and an interesting story. A talented panel will address these various issues in an afternoon of brisk, lively sessions.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that many of the world’s renown photographers, both past and present, have cut their professional teeth as photojournalists. Day in and day out they were developing and refining their skill in taking pictures that tell a story.

Two of the presenters are professional photojournalists who have treated us all to quality photographs. Todd Mizener of The Dispatch/ Argus and John Schultz of the Quad City Times both received academic degrees from the University of Iowa. They will talk about the process that they each have developed as they daily meet their professional challenges of taking pictures that tell us something or show us something. They have developed the skill to take great pictures, not mere snapshots, while shooting under the demands of time pressure.

Photographic giant Henri Cartier Bresson said, “Composition should be a constant preoccupation-an organic coordination of visual elements.” Two respected teachers from our region will make presentations concerning the various building blocks for constructing pictures that are strongly composed. Robyn Smith is a Fine Arts Instructor with EICC. She is an artist specializing in painting and printmaking. Roxanne Westphal teaches digital photography with the Davenport school system. She is a fine art photographer.

Robyn and Roxanne will offer insights to various tools to consider as you compose photos that communicate its message clearly and effectively.

This time is one where some significant innovations to camera technology are reaching the consumer marketplace. Ted Doty the manager of Camera Corner, will lead a show and tell to get us up to speed about new and exciting products that expand our photographic opportunities.

Brian Tugana minored in art at the University of Chicago and had instruction from instructors from the Art Institute of Chicago. He will share some of themes both good and bad that he has observed in the seven years he has participated in the Valley Bank Calendar Project.

The workshop will conclude with an opportunity for presenters and participants to network socialize, and swap insights.

The workshop is free. Reservations are required due to limited seating. To reserve a spot, register on the River Action website www.RiverAction.org, send an email to riveraction@riveraction.org, or call River Action at 563-322-2969.

Free Presentation on Portrait Photography by Amy Rose

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Event Summary

Amy Rose Photography will be offering a presentation on portrait photography. This is a great opportunity to hear from one of our area’s best photographers. The event is free and open to the public. Thanks to the University of Iowa Photography Club for hosting and arranging the meeting.

Event Details

Event Topics

Amy Rose will speak on the following topics:

  • The path she took to become a professional photographer.
  • The difference of doing photography as an art vs business.
  • How to run a successful business and provide valuable insider information.
  • Posing, lighting, and various portrait techniques.

Afterwards, she has offered to to talk to members about anything such as: gear, image critique, business set-up, industry insider info, individual shooting lessons, etc.

Bill Adams Photography Presentation

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An invitation from the University of Iowa Photography Club:

The next University of Iowa Photography Club meeting will be Monday, November 11, 6PM at the IMU Northwestern room. We will be hosting Bill Adams, a photojournalist who has traveled the world and shot for various magazines and newspapers. He will give a 45 min presentation on photojournalism.

Afterwards, we’ll be doing another photosharing session! I’m sure all of you have taken some great photos since the school started. Send in your favorite to uiphotoclub@gmail.com

Hope to see all of you there!

Thanks!

Thanks to everyone who has helped spread the word about this event. Below is a visitor map showing visitors to this page so far. Hope to see you there. Click the map to enlarge.

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Amy Rose Photography Presentation on Portrait Photography

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Event Summary

Amy Rose Photography will be offering a presentation on portrait photography. This is a great opportunity to hear from one of our area’s best photographers. The event is free and open to the public. Thanks to the University of Iowa Photography Club for hosting and arranging the meeting.

Event Details

Event Topics

Amy Rose will speak on the following topics:

  • The path she took to become a professional photographer.
  • The difference of doing photography as an art vs business.
  • How to run a successful business and provide valuable insider information.
  • Posing, lighting, and various portrait techniques.

Afterwards, she has offered to to talk to members about anything such as: gear, image critique, business set-up, industry insider info, individual shooting lessons, etc.

Images of Living Plants Can Be Considered as Intellectual Property and Copyrighted Content

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Preemptive Universal Copyright. Planning a trip to a park or garden? You may want to check with the curators or owners first. Your neighbor or local city park may not care if you’re taking photos of plant life and submitting it to a competition or using it commercially. However, more enterprising gardeners, landscapers, and facilities may claim the intellectual property rights and copyright to plants they watch over. This is similar to Monsanto claiming they own the corn in your field if it has their GMO signature on it.

Purpose. One may wonder why such aggressive, possessive, and opportunistic policies would be in place. Here are a few reasons:

  • Revenue. Capture all revenue of photos and ensure nobody is out there benefitting from the images either through sale or indirectly.
  • Image. Control the perception of the gardens’ image to ensure that all photos of the garden are of the highest quality.
  • Brand. Control the branding of all media including logos and fonts to be included with images.
  • Value. Limit public viewing to just a few images to ensure people will come to the garden and pay a fee to physically see the plant life. This helps retain the value of the physical on-site experience.
  • Contract. The contract with a hired photographer may promise their exclusive rights to take and display photos. A photographer known as the ‘official photographer’ of a certain museum or destination won’t want someone else out there sharing pictures that could be confused with their own work.

Gardens. The Denver Botanic Gardens is an example of a garden where images of the plant life are strictly controlled. Here is their policy:

“Photographs are a wonderful way to remember your visit to Denver Botanic Gardens. We encourage visitors to take casual photographs or shoot videos for their personal use. Personal photographs and videos are not to be used for commercial purposes. You may post your photo on our Facebook page – “Like” our page and share your photos with us!” [source]

Venues as Backdrops. It’s also common for images of venues, spaces, streets, and architecture to be strictly controlled. Here is the policy for York Street:

The photography session guidelines outlined below are intended for all guests, but a permit is necessary for those who wish to use the Gardens setting as the background for portraits or other posed photography. Denver Botanic Gardens considers a posed session to include wedding, engagement, family, graduation, prom photos, as well as senior photos or those for a modeling portfolio. It also includes any photographs for commercial use, such as fashion, advertisement and promotion, even if the photographer is not a professional. We appreciate your cooperation. … Visitors and members are permitted to take photographs and shoot videos for private, non-commercial use, except in specific exhibits or areas where photography may not be permitted. … We ask that all photographers honor these policies when using Denver Botanic Gardens as a backdrop for any photography or filming.” [source]

Future Considerations. It’s common for personal non-professional photos to later be used in a professional capacity. For example, let’s say a couple gets their engagement photo taken at a location. It’s a private personal photo. Later, in a documentary (video, print, or online) the photo is used as part of a montage. That photo is now being used illegally. Or, something as simple as including such a photo in a YouTube video may be a violation of policies of any monetization is connected to it.

__________

Photo Credit. The photo at the top of this page is from a Wikipedia article about the Denver Botanic Gardens. The photographer claims they have rights to use the photo in this way. However, because it’s not being used privately, but instead being used publicly and online where it can be widely viewed, this could likely represent a violation of the Denver Botanic Gardens’ policy on photography usage. The derivative work used here includes the caption of Denver Botanic Gardens. It’s possible the garden curators may prefer that the garden be credited whenever pictures are displayed.

Disabling Advertising on WordPress.com

If you’re looking for a great hosting platform, WordPress.com is definitely worth considering if you’ve ruled out the photography-specific hosting companies.

For the Iowa City Photographers Guild website, we chose WordPress.com because it is versatile and inexpensive. The basic hosting package is $18 a year for domain registration and hosting.

Once your website starts gaining traffic, WordPress.com reserved the right to place advertising at the bottom of your posts. It’s a complement if you see their advertising appear. It means they think your site is worth advertising on. However, it may be an annoyance to your site visitors.

You can disable advertising on WordPress.com from the Store menu, found in the Dashboard (your website control center). Within the store, there is an option to pay $30 per year for no advertising – a fairly inexpensive ad-on.

So, disabling ads raises the annual hosting fee by $30 from $18 a year to $48 per year.  It’s still economical. The $30 fee is presumably to cover the approximate annual revenue WordPress.com will lose when you stop ads.

Today we upgraded the Iowa City Photographers Guild website to be ad free. We felt the ads detracted from our site and it was well worth the $30 to turn them off.